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Suprematism style in interior design

Everyone knows the great Soviet avant-garde artist Kazimir Malevich, thanks to his unique work called “Black Square”. But few people know that this man became the founder of a whole trend in art, and it is called “Suprematism”. What is this style and how it can be displayed in the interior – read in today’s article of our magazine.
The history of Suprematism in art
Suprematism (from the Latin. Supremus – the highest) – direction in avant-garde art, founded in the 1st half of the 1910s by KS Malevich. Being a type of abstractionism, Suprematism was expressed in combinations of multi-colored planes of the simplest geometric outlines (in geometric forms of a straight line, square, circle, and rectangle). The combination of multi-colored and different-sized geometric figures forms balanced asymmetrical suprematic compositions permeated with internal movement. (from wikipedia)
To begin with, I would like to say that Kazimir Malevich was the author of not only the Black Square, but also his fellows: the White Square (White on White), as well as the Red Square. In addition, he had a no less famous painting called “The Black Circle”. In a word, proceeding from his greatest creations, it is already possible to conclude that Kazimir Malevich deftly and skillfully conveyed the primary colors through the simplest geometric figures (they acted as a conductor). Initially, the artist worked exclusively with the basis of the color scale (red, white, black and gray), and his “Black Square” was generally recognized as an absolute of color and shape. Later, however, Malevich expanded his horizons to more complex shades and shapes. So, at the beginning of the 20th century, a style called suprematism, unique in its simplicity and originality, was born.
Suprematism in interior design
This direction quickly moved from the paintings of Malevich to almost all areas of design, including interiors. Moreover, the results of the interaction of painting and the decor of the rooms can be absolutely fantastic, even taking into account the fact that Suprematism “repels” from the minimum palette and the simplest forms.
Whatever it was, this stylistic trend in interior design turns walls, floor and ceiling into canvas, and all the elements of furniture and decor into a single, beautiful creation. It is not surprising that Suprematism in the interior, as a rule, is expressed by white, gray or red walls, painted with various geometric shapes. As recommended by the specialists of the furniture factory Interdesign, the furniture in such a room should also be matched by the design of the walls. The presence of marvelous, streamlined elements is possible, which is why suprematism can be compared with the fascinating avant-garde style.
Where suprematism is appropriate
This style does not tolerate restrictions: neither conditional nor spatial. Proceeding from this, residential premises are made out in this style quite rarely. But European co-working centers, art-spaces, restaurants and even offices, where, as they say, there is a place where fantasies can roam, are quite often drawn up in the style of suprematism. This is a brighter, more airy and “free” alternative to minimalism, but a more restrained and sophisticated perspective for the avant-garde.
Living quarters, of course, can also be designed in the style of Suprematism, but the result will be successful only when this is allowed by the area and layout. For example, a youth studio apartment in the style of Suprematism may look just amazing.